After Weight-Loss Surgery, a Year of Joys and Disappointments : The Real Surprising Story

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It was Oct. 11, 2015, and a middle-aged man and a young woman, both severely obese, were struggling with the same lump-in-the-throat feeling. The next day they were going to have an irreversible operation. Were they on the threshold of a new beginning or a terrible mistake?

They were strangers, scheduled for back-to-back bariatric surgery at the University of Michigan with the same doctor. He would cut away most of their stomachs and reroute their small intestines. They were almost certain to lose much of their excess weight. But despite the drastic surgery, their doctor told them it was unlikely that they would ever be thin.

Nearly 200,000 Americans have bariatric surgery each year. Yet far more — an estimated 24 million — are heavy enough to qualify for the operation, and many of them are struggling with whether to have such a radical treatment, the only one that leads to profound and lasting weight loss for virtually everyone who has it.

Most people believe that the operation simply forces people to eat less by making their stomachs smaller, but scientists have discovered that it actually causes profound changes in patients’ physiology, altering the activity of thousands of genes in the human body as well as the complex hormonal signaling from the gut to the brain.

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Jessica Shapiro, second from left, talking to Keith Oleszkowicz at their doctor’s office the month before their surgeries. CreditMichael F. McElroy for The New York Times

It often leads to astonishing changes in the way things taste, making cravings for a rich slice of chocolate cake or a bag of White Castle hamburgers simply vanish. Those who have the surgery naturally settle at a lower weight.

 

 Over the last year, I followed Keith Oleszkowicz and Jessica Shapiro — a computer programmer and a college student — from their surgeries through the transformations that followed. The operation, increasingly common as obesity threatens the health of millions of Americans, changes not just the bodies of those who have it, but also their lives: how they see themselves and how they relate to their romantic partners, co-workers and families.

As the pounds fell away in a society that harshly judges fat people, Keith and Jessica, two ordinary Americans, would go through an extraordinary experience, one that brought both joys and disappointments.

Jessica, 22, lived with her mother and grandmother in Ann Arbor, Mich., and worked at Panera Bread preparing food. At 5-foot-3 and 295 pounds, she had a difficult life. She needed a seatbelt extender on airplanes. She was unable to cross her legs. She had acid reflux and mild sleep apnea, which meant she woke up at night about seven times an hour.

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“Every day of my life, I’m just aware of how overweight I am,” Jessica said. CreditMichael F. McElroy for The New York Times
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